iodine

iodine is a topic covered in the Taber's Medical Dictionary.

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(ī′ŏ-dīn″, -dēn″ )

[Gr. ioeidēs, violet-colored + -ine]
SYMB: I A nonmetallic chemical element of the halogen group, atomic weight (mass) 126.904, atomic number 53, specific gravity (solid, 20°C) 4.93. It is a black crystalline substance with a melting point of 113.5°C; it boils at 184.4°C, giving off a characteristic violet vapor. Sources of iodine include vegetables, esp. those growing near the seacoast; iodized salt; and seafoods, esp. liver of halibut and cod, or fish liver oils.
CAS # 7553-56-2

FUNCTION
Iodine is part of the hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), and prevents goiter by enabling the thyroid gland to function normally. The amount of iodine in the entire body averages 50 mg, of which 10 to 15 mg is found in the thyroid. The adult daily requirement for iodine is from 100 to 150 μg. Growing children, adolescents, pregnant women, and those under emotional strain need more than this amount of iodine.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS
Iodine deficiency in the diet may lead to simple goiter characterized by thyroid enlargement and hypothyroidism. In young children, this deficiency may result in retardation of physical, sexual, and mental development, a condition called cretinism.

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