clothing

clothing is a topic covered in the Taber's Medical Dictionary.

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[AS. clath, cloth]
Wearing apparel; used both functionally and decoratively. From the medical standpoint, clothes conserve heat or protect the body, e.g., gloves, sunhelmets, and shoes. Air spaces in a fabric and its texture, rather than the material alone, conserve heat. In matted woolen fabrics, the air spaces are destroyed and insulation is lost. Wool and silk absorb more moisture than other fabrics, but silk loses it more readily. Cotton and linen come next, but linen loses moisture more quickly than cotton. Knitted fabrics absorb and dry more readily than woven fabrics of the same material. The temperature inside an individual's hat may vary from 13° to 20°F (7° to 11°C) warmer than the outside temperature.
SEE: clo; SEE: hypothermia

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[AS. clath, cloth]
Wearing apparel; used both functionally and decoratively. From the medical standpoint, clothes conserve heat or protect the body, e.g., gloves, sunhelmets, and shoes. Air spaces in a fabric and its texture, rather than the material alone, conserve heat. In matted woolen fabrics, the air spaces are destroyed and insulation is lost. Wool and silk absorb more moisture than other fabrics, but silk loses it more readily. Cotton and linen come next, but linen loses moisture more quickly than cotton. Knitted fabrics absorb and dry more readily than woven fabrics of the same material. The temperature inside an individual's hat may vary from 13° to 20°F (7° to 11°C) warmer than the outside temperature.
SEE: clo; SEE: hypothermia

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